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51 Florida Marriage Collection, 1822-1875 and 1927-2001 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data:

Florida Department of Health. Florida Marriage Index, 1927-2001. Florida Department of Health, Jacksonville, Florida.
Marriages records from various counties located in county courthouses and/or on microfilm at the Family History Library 
Source (S99)
 
52 For the most part these can be trusted, however mistakes occasionally do happen when LDS members transfer data from old hand-written church and civil records Source (S1)
 
53 From Church Record "the Twenty eighth of September one thousand nine hundred and thirteenwe the underssigned parish priest have baptized Henry John, born the eighteenth of this month, Legitimate son of Henry John Scroope, Baggage=Porter and Mary O'Connor of this parish. The sponsors were John McGuiness and Kathleen McGuiness, who signed with the father. Scroope, Henry John Jr (I1661)
 
54 From son Benjamin's baptismal record Scroop, William (I951)
 
55 Geoffrey was a Carthusian monk and was never summoned to parliament. With him terminated the male line of Scropes of Masham and Upsall. The estates were divided between his three sisters, Elizabeth, Alice and Margaret and the title fell into abey SCROPE, Geoffrey b.1467 (I1077)
 
56 George Julius Poulett Scrope FRS was an
English geologist and political economist as
well as a magistrate for Stroud in
Gloucestershire.
He was the second son of J. Poulett
Thompson of Waverley Abbey, Surrey. He was
educated at Harrow, and for a short time at
Pembroke College, Oxford, but in 1816 he
entered St John's College, Cambridge,
graduating BA in 1821.[1] through the
influence of Edward Clarke and Adam
Sedgwick became interested in mineralogy
and geology.
During the winter of 1816–1817 he was at
Naples, and was so keenly interested in
Vesuvius that he renewed his studies of the
volcano in 1818; and in the following year
visited Etna and the Lipari Islands. In 1821
he married the daughter and heiress of
William Scrope of Castle Combe, Wiltshire,
and assumed her name; and he entered the
House of Commons of the United Kingdom in
1833 as MP for Stroud, retaining his seat until
1868.
Meanwhile he began to study the volcanic
regions of central France in 1821, and visited
the Eifel district in 1823. In 1825 he
published Considerations on Volcanos, leading
to the establishment of a new theory of the
Earth, and in the following year was elected
FRS. This earlier work was subsequently
amplified and issued under the title of
Volcanos (1862); an authoritative text-book
of which a second edition was published ten
years later.
In 1827 he issued his classic Memoir on the Geology of Central France, including the
Volcanic formations of Auvergne, the Velay
and the Vivarais, a quarto volume illustrated
by maps and plates. The substance of this
was reproduced in a revised and somewhat
more popular form in The Geology and extinct
Volcanos of Central France (1858). These
books were the first widely published
descriptions of the Chaîne des Puys, a chain
of over 70 small volcanoes in the Massif
Central.
Scrope was awarded the Wollaston Medal by
the Geological Society of London in 1867.
Among his other works was the History of the
Manor and Ancient Barony of Castle Combe 
Scrope, George Poulett Julius Thompson FRS (I972)
 
57 He was a soldier-adventurer in Lithuania,[1] Italy and France, where he served with John of Gaunt. Gaunt made him seneschal of Aquitaine in 1383.[2] He was made vice-chamberlain of the household of King Richard II in 1393 and granted the castle and manor of Marlborough in Wiltshire.[3] In the same year his father purchased for him the Isle of Man from the earl of Salisbury, giving him the nominal title Dominus de Man or King of Mann.[4] In 1394 he became a Knight of the Garter.
He was made Earl of Wiltshire in 1397 and became Lord High Treasurer in 1398.[5] He became effective head of the government in Richard's absence.[6] He benefitted from the confiscated estates of Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick, who was kept for a time under his hand in the Isle of Man, and of John of Gaunt; he also accumulated control of a number of strategic castles.[7] He was left 2,000 marks in King Richard's will in April 1399.
He had been closely involved in Richard's second marriage to the 6-year-old Isabella of Valois in 1396 [8] and was made Isabella's guardian at Wallingford Castle,[9] of which he was castellan,[10] when the King went to Ireland in 1399.
Together with Sir John Bussy, Sir William Bagot and Sir Henry Green he had been made responsible for assisting the Duke of York in the defence of the realm during Richard's absence, when the exiled Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford seized his chance to invade. Scrope was captured with Bussy and Green when Bristol Castle surrendered to Henry on July 28, 1399. He was executed without trial in Bristol Castle, together with Bussy and Green, and his head carried to London in a white basket to be displayed on London Bridge. After Hereford's ascendance to the throne as Henry IV, Parliament confirmed the sentence and determined that all his estates and title were to be forfeit to the crown.[11 
Scrope, Sir William (Twin) K. G. Earl of Wiltshire (I418)
 
58 He was also known as Charles Paulett. In 1655 he was a Cavalier prisoner.1 He was styled as Lord St. John in 1655.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Winchester in 1660.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Hampshire between 1661 and 1675.1 He held the office of Warden of the New Forest between 1668 and 1675.1 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Hampshire between 1668 and 1675.1 He was Keeper of the King's Lodge at Petersham in 1671.1 He succeeded to the title of 6th Marquess of Winchester on 5 March 1674/75.1 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 22 April 1679.1 He was a Commissioner of Claims in 1689.1 He was Colonel of the Regiment of Foot between 1689 and 1698.1 He held the office of Warden of the New Forest between 1689 and 1699.1 He gained the title of 1st Duke of Bolton [England] on 9 April 1689.1 On 20 April 1692 he was among those excepted from pardon in the declaration of King James II.1
     Bishop Burnett writes that "he was a man of a strange mixture. He had the spleen to a high degree and affected an extravagent behaviour; for many weeks he would not open his mouth till such an hour of the day when he thought the air was pure. He changed the day into night, and often hunted by torch-light, and took all sorts of liberties to himself, many of which were very disagreeable to those about him. He was a man of most profuse expense,a nd of a most ravenous avarice to support that; and tho' he was much hated, yet he carried matters before him with such authority and success, that he was in all respects the great riddle of the age."2
From 'The Peerage' website 
Powlett, Duke Charles Edward of Bolton (I407)
 
59 Henry and his brother are at school at St. Cuthbert's Scroope, Henry (I1450)
 
60 Henry was two when his father died and he became a ward of the Nevilles like his father. He was first summoned to Parliament in 1441 during the reign of Henry VI
 
Scrope, Sir Henry Le , 4th Lord Bolton (I85)
 
61 In 1841, Francis is a Publican and living with his wife and mother
 
Scroop, Francis (I217)
 
62 In 1841, Susannah was living with her son and must have died just after the census was taken
 
Eyre, Susannah (I59)
 
63 IN 1851, Anne is living with her sister Frances and two servants Scroope, Anne Clementina (I905)
 
64 in 1851, Cornelius is a farm laborer and living with his new wife a schoolmistress in Saddleworth. They are Lodging with Molly Buckley Scroop, Cornelius (I1504)
 
65 In 1851, Edward was visiting at the home of Thomas Meynell, a justice of the peace Scroope, Edward Gervase (George) (I900)
 
66 IN 1851, Frances is living with her sister Anne and Two Servants Scroope, Frances (I899)
 
67 In 1851, George and his wife are living with his father-in-law, William Scrope Scrope, George Poulett Julius Thompson FRS (I972)
 
68 In 1851, Mary was living with her parents.
In 1861, Mary was living with her parents.
 
SCROOP, MARY (I323)
 
69 In 1851, Rebecca is living with her parents SCROOP, REBECCA (I326)
 
70 In 1851, Rebecca was liiving with her parents.
In 1861, Rebecca was living with her parents
 
SCROOP, REBECCA (I326)
 
71 In 1851, Samuel is a Whitesmith and living with his wife, children and 4 lodgers. SCROOP, Samuel (I36)
 
72 In 1851, Samuel is living with his parents SCROOP, SAMUEL (I331)
 
73 In 1851, Samuel is living with his parents.
In 1861, Samuel is living with his parents.
 
SCROOP, SAMUEL (I331)
 
74 In 1851, Sarah is a Schoolmistress and lodging with her husband at Molly Buckley's Bottomley, Sarah (I1516)
 
75 In 1851, William is listed as a landed Proprietor, widowed and his daughter, Emma, and her husband are living with him. SCROPE, William (I885)
 
76 IN 1860, W H is a trader with real estate valued at $19,000 and Personal estate values at $9,200 Scrope, W H (I1673)
 
77 In 1861, Adele is living with her widowed father at Danby Hall Scrope, Adala Mary Elizabeth (I1282)
 
78 In 1861, Anne and her brother Edward are keeping house Scroope, Anne Clementina (I905)
 
79 In 1861, George is described as a Landed Proprietor and is living with his wife and six servants Scrope, George Poulett Julius Thompson FRS (I972)
 
80 In 1861, Simon is a widower and has his son,Simon, Daughter-in-law, Emily and three grandchildren plus daughter, Adele living with him at Danby Hall Scrope, Simon Thomas (I901)
 
81 In 1871, Cornelius is living with his parents and working as a Whitesmith SCROOP, Cornelius (I34)
 
82 In 1871, Francis is living with his parents SCROOP, FRANCIS RICHARD (I307)
 
83 In 1871, Samuel is a Whitesmith and living with his wife and three children at 5 St. Marks St. SCROOP, Samuel (I36)
 
84 In 1881, Anna was a hosiery mender SHEPPARD, ANNA MARIA (I345)
 
85 In 1881, Cornelius was living with his wife, parents, sister, and his son and daughter at St Marks St No 7, Nottingham, England. He was employed as a Blacksmith
In 1891, Cornelius is living with his family in Handsworth, Yorkshire and employed as a Blacksmith.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

In 1861, Cornelius is living with his parents.
In 1871, Cornelius is living with his parents and working as a Whitesmith.
In 1881, Cornelius was living with his wife, parents, sister, and his son and daughter at St Marks St No 7, Nottingham,
In 1911, Cornelius is a Collier Blacksmith and living with his wife and son at 58 Frederick Street 
SCROOP, Cornelius (I34)
 
86 In 1881, Elizabeth was employed as a lace Clipper.
In 1891, Elizabeth seems to have been using her middle name, Ellen, and was a lace maker

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

In 1861, Elizabeth is a lace worker and living with her parents
In 1871, Elizabeth is a stitching machinest and living with her mother
In 1881, Elizabeth was employed as a lace Clipper.
In 1891, Elizabeth seems to have been using her middle name
In 1911, Elizabeth is living with her husband of 35 years and youngest son 
HUNT, Elizabeth Ellen (I35)
 
87 In 1881, Ellen was living with her parents and Brother and his family at St Marks St. No 7, Nottingham, England. Her occupation was given as Cigar Maker.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

In 1881, Ellen was living with her parents and Brother and his family at St Marks St. No 7, Nottingham, England. Her occupation was given as Cigar Maker.
 
SCROOP, Ellen (I152)
 
88 In 1881, Francis is a blacksmith and living with his wife at 33 Newcastle St. SCROOP, FRANCIS RICHARD (I307)
 
89 In 1881, Helen was living with her parents SCROOP, Helen (I153)
 
90 In 1881, Mary is living with her husband, daughter,son and his family at St Marks St No 7, Nottingham, England

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

In 1851, Mary is a box maker and living with her husband, three children and four lodgers at 19 Clare Street.
In 1861, Mary is a box maker and living with her husband and children in St. Mary Parish
In 1881, Mary is living with her husband, d 
BOWMAN, Mary (I37)
 
91 In 1881, Samuel was living at St. Marks No 7, Nottingham, England with his wife, daughter Ellen, son Corneliius, daugther-in-law Elizabeth,grandson Samuel and granddaughter Helen. His Occupation is given as Blacksmith

Also in the 1881 census, this entire household was listed as Scoops rather than Scroop. Since birth dates, given names and relationships all coincide with other records - it is believed that the transcriber mis read the original census record.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

In 1851, Samuel is a Journeyman Whitesmith and living with his family at 19 Clare Street in St Mary Parish. They also have four lodgers that deal in Jewelry - two from Prussia and two from Poland.
In 1861, Samuel is a white smith and living wit 
SCROOP, Samuel (I36)
 
92 In 1881, Samuel was living with his parents SCROOP, Samuel (I15)
 
93 In 1891, Francis is an Engineer's Smith and living with his family on Station St SCROOP, FRANCIS RICHARD (I307)
 
94 In 1901, Annie is living with her parents SCROOP, ANNIE (I180)
 
95 In 1901, Arthur is living with his parents at 11 Albert Street
 
SCROOP, Arthur William (I283)
 
96 In 1901, Cornelius is listed as William E and is a blacksmith and living with his family at 11 Albert St SCROOP, Cornelius (I34)
 
97 In 1901, Elizabeth (or Ellen) birthplace is given as Derby HUNT, Elizabeth Ellen (I35)
 
98 In 1901, Emily is a widow and living with 5 of her children and several servants Berkeley, Emily Jane (I1285)
 
99 In 1901, Francis (called Richard - middle name) is a general labourer and living with his parents SCROOP, FRANCIS RICHARD (I175)
 
100 In 1901, Francis was a blacksmith at the Colliery and living with his family at 22 Fitzmaurice Rd SCROOP, FRANCIS RICHARD (I307)
 

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